nothing for the non-reading student.'

For more information, please call the Information Desk, 737-4065 or the Circulation Desk, 785-5354.

The dedication to An Untamed State reads, “For women the world over.”

This thesis explores the “theories of change” that inform institutional investments in documentary and examines how three public interest media organizations – the National Film Board of Canada, POV and the New York Times – are approaching interactive documentary production, attempting to define what constitutes success or impact.

Through his writings (The 95 theses), he precipitated the Reformation.

Anderson, Chris. ‘The Long Tail’, Wired 12.10, October (2004),.

Since 2007, all theses are now submitted electronically. Links are available through both the eCommons and the library catalogue as soon as they are approved by the thesis committee.

He had read the theses of Luther, and found them conformable to the doctrines of Scripture.

Starting with the Yale School of Medicine (YSM) graduating class of 2002, the Medical Library and Office of Student Research have collaborated to electronically publish the full text of student thesis on the Internet as a valuable byproduct of student research efforts and original source material to researchers throughout the world. The electronic thesis deposit has been a graduation requirement since 2006. Starting with the class of 2011, YSM theses will also be deposited in the Proquest system and accessible through . Note: If a medical student selects a temporary or permanent embargo for campus-only access, the full-text will not be available in the Proquest system during the embargo. Thesis abstracts should be available in either YMTDL or Proquest.

ALAIN BADIOU–Fifteen Theses on Contemporary Art The Drawing Center, December 4/2003


The thesis statement is also a good test for the scope of your intent. The principle to remember is that when you try to do too much, you end up doing less or nothing at all. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in the United States? At best, such a paper would be vague and scattered in its approach. Can we write a good paper about problems in higher education in Connecticut? Well, we're getting there, but that's still an awfully big topic, something we might be able to handle in a book or a Ph.D. dissertation, but certainly not in a paper meant for a Composition course. Can we write a paper about problems within the community college system in Connecticut. Now we're narrowing down to something useful, but once we start writing such a paper, we would find that we're leaving out so much information, so many ideas that even most casual brainstorming would produce, that we're not accomplishing much. What if we wrote about the problem of community colleges in Connecticut being so close together geographically that they tend to duplicate programs unnecessarily and impinge on each other's turf? Now we have a focus that we can probably write about in a few pages (although more, certainly, could be said) and it would have a good argumentative edge to it. To back up such a thesis statement would require a good deal of work, however, and we might be better off if we limited the discussion to an example of how two particular community colleges tend to work in conflict with each other. It's not a matter of being lazy; it's a matter of limiting our discussion to the work that can be accomplished within a certain number of pages.2. The relation between the two nouns is also tense, as becomes clear if one takes the trouble to specify their meaning. Religion, I submit, is that discourse whose defining characteristic is its desire to speak of things eternal and transcendent with an authority equally transcendent and eternal. History, in the sharpest possible contrast, is that discourse which speaks of things temporal and terrestrial in a human and fallible voice, while staking its claim to authority on rigorous critical practice. 1. The conjunction "of" that joins the two nouns in the disciplinary ethnonym "History of Religions" is not neutral filler. Rather, it announces a proprietary claim and a relation of encompassment: History is the method and Religion the object of study. 3. History of religions is thus a discourse that resists and reverses the orientation of that discourse with which it concerns itself. To practice history of religions in a fashion consistent with the discipline's claim of title is to insist on discussing the temporal, contextual, situated, interested, human, and material dimensions of those discourses, practices, and institutions that characteristically represent themselves as eternal, transcendent, spiritual, and divine. The thesis statement should remain flexible until the paper is actually finished. It ought to be one of the last things that we fuss with in the rewriting process. If we discover new information in the process of writing our paper that ought to be included in the thesis statement, then we'll have to rewrite our thesis statement. On the other hand, if we discover that our paper has done adequate work but the thesis statement appears to include things that we haven't actually addressed, then we need to limit that thesis statement. If the thesis statement is something that we needed prior approval for, changing it might require the permission of the instructor or thesis committee, but it is better to seek such permission than to write a paper that tries to do too much or that claims to do less than it actually accomplishes.The first paragraph serves as kind of a funnel opening to the essay which draws and invites readers into the discussion, which is then focused by the thesis statement before the work of the essay actually begins. You will discover that some writers will delay the articulation of the paper's focus, its thesis, until the very end of the paper. That is possible if it is clear to thoughtful readers throughout the paper what the business of the essay truly is; frankly, it's probably not a good idea for beginning writers.4. The same destabilizing and irreverent questions one might ask of any speech act ought be posed of religious discourse. The first of these is "Who speaks here?", i.e., what person, group, or institution is responsible for a text, whatever its putative or apparent author. Beyond that, "To what audience? In what immediate and broader context? Through what system of mediations? With what interests?" And further, "Of what would the speaker(s) persuade the audience? What are the consequences if this project of persuasion should happen to succeed? Who wins what, and how much? Who, conversely, loses?" We hope that you will take a moment to upload your theses, dissertations and other publications -- and ask your colleagues to do the same. The more comprehensive our database is, the more useful it is to everyone!